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The Quarter Millennium of Vacheron Co...

Geneva, April 03, 2005

LOT 162

“Calibre Leschot” Vacheron & Constantin, Genève, case and movement No. 123746. Made in 1867. Very fine and rare 18K gold hunting-cased watch with early nickel movement. Accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity.

C. Four-body, “lentille”, both spring-loaded covers finely engine-turnedwith vermicelli pattern, polished band, front withmonogram “LJ” in a cartouche. Hinged gold cuvette. D. Whiteenamel, radial Roman numerals, outer minute track, subsidiaryseconds. Blued steel Breguet hands. M. Cal. 16’’’ A, maillechort,Leschot caliber, “fausses côtes” decoration, hanging barrel, 15jewels, lateral lever escapement, cut-bimetallic compensationbalance, flat balance spring, index regulator with the scale onthe center wheel bridge.Signed and numbered on movement and cuvette, case punchedGeneva gold mark.Diam. 43 mm.

C. Four-body, “lentille”, both spring-loaded covers finely engine-turnedwith vermicelli pattern, polished band, front withmonogram “LJ” in a cartouche. Hinged gold cuvette.
D. Whiteenamel, radial Roman numerals, outer minute track, subsidiaryseconds. Blued steel Breguet hands.
M. Cal. 16’’’ A, maillechort,Leschot caliber, “fausses côtes” decoration, hanging barrel, 15jewels, lateral lever escapement, cut-bimetallic compensationbalance, flat balance spring, index regulator with the scale onthe center wheel bridge.Signed and numbered on movement and cuvette, case punchedGeneva gold mark.Diam. 43 mm.

CHF 2,000 - 3,000

EUR 1,300 - 2,000 / USD 1,700 - 2,500

Sold: CHF 5,750


Grading System
Grade: AAA

Excellent

Case: 3

Good

Movement: 3*

Good

Overhaul recommended, at buyer's expense

Dial: 2 - 01

Notes

This movement of this watch is an excellent example of the type made by Vacheron & Constantin utilizing the pantograph invented by Georges Leschot, their chief engineer, circa 1830. The invention of the pantograph revolutionized the production of watches to such a degree that E. Favre-Perret wrote in his report on the 1876 Philidelphia Centennial Exhibition the following; “Messrs Vacheron & Constantin are even more advanced (in regard to interchangeability); for 40 years they have not ceased, with the assistance of the skilful engineer Mr. G. Leschot, to improve and extend manufacture by machines; we can say with certainty that they have arrived, in the end, at a point which can hardly be bettered, and their products enjoy an unrivaled reputation throughout the whole world.”